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SERE sergeant promoted for outstanding work

Staff Sgt. Raymond CaballeroPerez, 22nd Operations Support Squadron Survival, Evasion, Recovery and Escape operations and training NCO in charge, poses for a photo with wing leadership Dec. 19, 2018, at McConnell Air Force Base, Kansas. Perez was selected as an Air Mobility Command Stripes to Exceptional Performers promotee for his work as a SERE specialist. (Courtesy photo)

Staff Sgt. Raymond CaballeroPerez, 22nd Operations Support Squadron Survival, Evasion, Recovery and Escape operations and training NCO in charge, poses for a photo with wing leadership Dec. 19, 2018, at McConnell Air Force Base, Kansas. Perez was selected as an Air Mobility Command Stripes to Exceptional Performers promotee for his work as a SERE specialist. (Courtesy photo)

MCCONNELL AIR FORCE BASE, Kan. -- Stripes to Exceptional Performers is an Air Force program that rewards Airmen who consistently perform above their peers with an on-the-spot promotion by the wing commander. Every base submits an Airman to their Major Command and one person is chosen to be immediately promoted.

Tech. Sgt. Raymond CaballeroPerez, 22nd Operations Support Squadron Survival, Evasion, Recovery and Escape operations and training NCO in charge, was selected as an Air Mobility Command STEP promotee Dec. 17, 2018, here.

As a SERE specialist, he teaches classes, field exercises and water confidence courses. He is also in charge of multiple wing-level programs.

“I conducted over 850 hours in the field, which is a little over a month of the year, teaching and doing Combat Search and Rescue exercises,” said Perez. “Working with multilateral/joint rescue assets and testing capabilities are a large part of the job. I made many cold calls to UH-60 Black Hawk units to coordinate joint training.”

From being a jumpmaster to a U.S. Army combatives instructor who certifies Green Berets or mentoring other Airmen looking to enter the special operations world, he has been involved in his work and in helping others succeed.

“The best advice I can give to guys and gals is do things that impact the Air Force or sister services in a big way,” said Perez. “Do your research so you can speak intelligently. Learn people’s processes and don’t let your rank keep you from leading training opportunities.”