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22nd CS Airman earns spotlight performer

Airman 1st Class Tevin Manuel, 22nd Communications Squadron cyber surety technician, receives a certificate from Col. Albert Miller, 22nd Air Refueling Wing commander, May 18, 2017, at McConnell Air Force Base, Kan. Manuel earned the spotlight performer for the week of April 24-28. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Erin McClellan)

Airman 1st Class Tevin Manuel, 22nd Communications Squadron cyber surety technician, receives a certificate from Col. Albert Miller, 22nd Air Refueling Wing commander, May 18, 2017, at McConnell Air Force Base, Kan. Manuel earned the spotlight performer for the week of April 24-28. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Erin McClellan)

MCCONNELL AIR FORCE BASE, Kan.— As a spotlight performer, individuals are chosen by leadership for demonstrating the Air Force's Core Values: Integrity First, Service Before Self, and Excellence in All We Do.

Airman 1st Class Tevin Manuel, 22nd Communications Squadron cyber surety technician, received the spotlight performer for the week of April 24-28.

Manuel protects the wing information enclave for thousands of unclassified and classified systems worth $17 million, and he manages and trains 129 cybersecurity liaisons across McConnell’s three wings. In addition, he manages the installation emissions security program, providing operational security and oversight for classified systems and more than 200 collateral processing areas. He also administers the 22nd Air Refueling Wing cyber surety program, assuring the security of information technology assets.

“Manuel is the go-to individual on all things dealing with cyber security,” said Chief Master Sgt. William Barnett, 22nd CS superintendent. “His tenacious attitude for excellence when accomplishing tasks is contagious with the peers in his work center, and he leads by example.”

Manuel, a Jackson, Tennessee, native, joined the Air Force in September 2015 and arrived at McConnell in February 2016. His hobbies include Ultimate Frisbee, computer tinkering, water-based activities and camping.

Who is the most positive influence in your life and why?

My younger sister Devin has been the most positive influence in my life. Devin was my first sibling, the first person an older child is truly responsible for. The responsibility of being a role model alone motivates me to be the best human I can be, because now my actions are impressionable, whether I am up to it or not.

If you could give advice to a new Airman, what would it be and why?

Be present. Where you are is where life is happening, therefore you must be there with everything you have to offer. What you are doing in this moment is aligning your future and dreams. I learned this in a former role, prior to entering the military. I struggled grasping the concept of being present because I felt that it was a theme that stifled ambition. I was wrong. Be present.

What is one goal that you have already accomplished, or would like to accomplish, during your Air Force career?

A goal I have while in the Air Force is to develop our cyber ten-fold, and to coordinate with our peer branches and agencies to be the nation who views and utilizes cyber just as we do air, ground, and naval forces.

Where is the most interesting place you have traveled, and why do you feel that way?

Australia was the most interesting place I have had the opportunity to live. What made this experience so remarkable was a combination of factors; however, the people were principal. The diversity of cultures fostered by the community provided me with the opportunity to see how people of the world lived, played and laughed. Don’t get me wrong though, the kangaroo steaks and Great Barrier Reef are notable.

If you had the opportunity to meet anyone in the world, who would it be and why?

With the opportunity to meet anyone in the world, during any period in history, it would be Gen. William “Billy” Mitchell. Our nation, the United States, has led the world in securing democracy, but in order to lead as a nation, we followed as an organization. We followed visionaries; who at times, had to learn through hind-sight. What level of unrelenting conviction and persistence did it require to dynamically mold the future of our nation’s defense? What thoughts would the father of the Air Force have of our nation’s defense today? What would he think of our role in cyber?