HomeNewsCommentaries

Commentary Search

  • Air Force family

    Lately, there has been lot of focus on social media and water cooler discussions on what the Air Force gets wrong, and how hard the Air Force lifestyle can be.
  • Flexibility

    Most of us have studied the professional development guide, also known as the Air Force Handbook 1, and read about the tenets of airpower, some have even thought, “This doesn’t apply to me.”
  • When exactly did you join the Air Force?

    I joined the Air Force at the end of my second enlistment. At the time, I was a staff sergeant looking back with disappointment on nearly a decade of service. I felt unfulfilled, unappreciated and was struggling to decide my next move toward self-actualization. I did not feel like a “real cop.”
  • Are you blooming where you are planted?

    I love to garden and be outside. This Spring, my husband and I decided it was time to start establishing our property and planted over 60 saplings.
  • Building trust

    We often hear that trust is an essential element of any successful organization, but what does that really mean?
  • The importance of quality feedback

    When was the last time you received feedback? How often do you receive feedback? Was it formal or informal? Was it meaningful?
  • Culture, character and communication

    When I first arrived at McConnell, I began receiving summaries of operations reports submitted across the Air Force. Week after week, I read about suicide after suicide in alarming numbers. Since then, I’ve been focusing on how to communicate with Airmen about our culture and character to build a more resilient force.
  • Mastery: Demand competence, pursue excellence

    Sun Tzu notably said in The Art of War, "To see victory only when it is within the ken of the common herd is not the acme of excellence.”
  • Leadership and expectation

    Expectation is a gift and a pillar of successful leadership; in fact, Yale University list Leadership Expectations as a key attribute and competency for their leaders. These expectations parallel and expand the expectations Air Force leaders should impart to subordinates.
  • Leadership: it's a team sport

    Leadership in the Air Force isn't simply a role you take on based on a position you've attained or your expertise you apply to a technical problem. It's an activity of monitoring and adapting to the challenges presented to your unit to ensure mission accomplishment and effectiveness. It’s allowing yourself to be vulnerable and caring for the personnel in your unit as much as the challenges your unit may face. Leadership is not an opportunity provided to only the unit commander but an opportunity for personnel at all levels of responsibility.
RSS