HomeNewsFeaturesDisplay

Need PT improvement? schedule a running test

MCCONNELL AIR FORCE BASE, Kan. -- Bart Patterson, Health and Wellness Center health technician, is checking Lt. Col. Jon Woods’, 931st Operation Support Flight, arches during a running shoe evaluation Oct. 1, at the HAWC.  Most running injuries can be traced back to the condition or type of running shoe that person uses. (Photo by Airman 1st Class Roy Lynch III.)

MCCONNELL AIR FORCE BASE, Kan. -- Bart Patterson, Health and Wellness Center health technician, is checking Lt. Col. Jon Woods’, 931st Operation Support Flight, arches during a running shoe evaluation Oct. 1, at the HAWC. Most running injuries can be traced back to the condition or type of running shoe that person uses. (Photo by Airman 1st Class Roy Lynch III.)

MCCONNELL AIR FORCE BASE, Kan. -- Bart Patterson, Health and Wellness Center health technician, shows Lt. Col. Jon Woods, 931st Operation Support Flight, how his bio-mechanics are working for a running shoe evaluation Oct. 1 at the HAWC.  By using the footage, Patterson can show how a person is performing. (Photo by Airman 1st Class Roy Lynch III.)

MCCONNELL AIR FORCE BASE, Kan. -- Bart Patterson, Health and Wellness Center health technician, shows Lt. Col. Jon Woods, 931st Operation Support Flight, how his bio-mechanics are working for a running shoe evaluation Oct. 1 at the HAWC. By using the footage, Patterson can show how a person is performing. (Photo by Airman 1st Class Roy Lynch III.)

MCCONNELL AIR FORCE BASE, Kan. -- Bart Patterson, Health and Wellness Center health technician, shows Lt. Col. Jon Woods, 931st Operation Support Flight, what type of shoe he should be running in, Oct. 1 at the HAWC.  A person will need new running shoes if their shoes show these signs: worn out, wrinkled, or separation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Roy Lynch III)

MCCONNELL AIR FORCE BASE, Kan. -- Bart Patterson, Health and Wellness Center health technician, shows Lt. Col. Jon Woods, 931st Operation Support Flight, what type of shoe he should be running in, Oct. 1 at the HAWC. A person will need new running shoes if their shoes show these signs: worn out, wrinkled, or separation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Roy Lynch III)

MCCONNELL AIR FORCE BASE, Kan. -- How could the Health and Wellness Center help improve a person's run time for his next physical training test? 

Of the many health programs featured at the HAWC, the Running Shoe Evaluation provides a look on how well a person can strut their stuff. 

Wearing the proper foot wear while running plays a big part on how people perform. The running shoe evaluation tests participant proper footwear for running. Bart Patterson of the HAWC staff administrates the evaluation. 

Bart Patterson starts the process by asking participants general questions: How old are those shoes, are the souls worn away and are there any aches and pains that accompany the physical activity? 

The participant then takes their shoes off and stands with feet spread about shoulder width a part. 

Mr. Patterson looks for any pronation, which is rotation of the bones, in the foot so that the weight is borne, mainly on the inside foot. 

The participant then runs on a treadmill for 30 seconds with their shoes off and then again with shoes on, while Mr. Patterson records the natural bio-mechanics of how the person's joints move. 

Mr. Patterson explains to participants their bio-mechanics function and which type of shoe should be worn to improve the stability of the runner. 

If soles of the shoes could be worn out, wrinkled, or separating, it may be the reason that there are aches and pains. A person can not run in the right position if there is foot pronation which can lead to an uncomfortable running experience and could result in a slower run time, he explains. 

"Most running injuries can be related back to the condition or type of running shoe that person is in," said Mr. Patterson. "Once you are able to run in the right position, you are then able to push your body, picking up your speed, picking up your distance." 

The HAWC can help a person improve their run time, just take the running shoe evaluation. When people are able to run in the right position then their speed and distance can improve. For more information contact Bart Patterson at 759-1795.