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McConnell hand-picked to lead ‘LRS evolution’

Tech. Sgt. Scott Alexander, 22nd Logistics Readiness Squadron, inspects the tire treads of a helium tank trailer prior to driving it on to the flightline Nov. 4, the day LRS Airmen loaded several tanks onto a C-17, from the 62nd Airlift Wing, McChord Air Force Base, Wash. The C-17 transported the tanks to Southwest Asia. Mission capability support functions such as this will fall under the supply chain management flight once the 22nd LRS finishes realigning its structure from seven flights to four. The new flights will include the supply chain management flight, the readiness flight, the fuels management flight and the vehicle and equipment management flight. (Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Troy Karr, 22nd ARW Public Affairs)

Tech. Sgt. Scott Alexander, 22nd Logistics Readiness Squadron, inspects the tire treads of a helium tank trailer prior to driving it on to the flightline Nov. 4, the day LRS Airmen loaded several tanks onto a C-17, from the 62nd Airlift Wing, McChord Air Force Base, Wash. The C-17 transported the tanks to Southwest Asia. Mission capability support functions such as this will fall under the supply chain management flight once the 22nd LRS finishes realigning its structure from seven flights to four. The new flights will include the supply chain management flight, the readiness flight, the fuels management flight and the vehicle and equipment management flight. (Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Troy Karr, 22nd ARW Public Affairs)

MCCONNELL AIR FORCE BASE, Kan. -- The Air Force has hand-picked McConnell to be one of twelve bases Air Force-wide to restructure its logistics readiness squadron to better meet the needs of the evolving force.

Selected bases will streamline several logistics functions using Air Force Smart Operations 21 principles of eliminating unnecessary practices and focusing on work that contributes directly to the Air Force mission.

The Air Force has provided all twelve bases with the same guidance on restructuring their logistics readiness squadrons and will use the bases to validate the process before implementing it across the force.

"We're validating - shaping the way other logistics readiness squadrons will be re-aligning Air Force-wide," said Chief Master Sgt. Robert Griffiths, 22nd LRS operations superintendent.

On Jan. 26, the 22nd Logistics Readiness Squadron began the process of reorganizing itself into four flights. It previously consisted of seven flights, the fuels management flight, the materiel management flight, the readiness flight, the management and systems flight, the traffic management flight, the vehicle management flight and the vehicle operations flight.

Under the new four-flight structure, the 22nd LRS will include the supply chain management flight, the readiness flight, the fuels management flight and the vehicle and equipment management flight.

The purpose of creating the new flights is to realign the 22nd LRS, so logistics functions that provide related services can more easily work together and so unnecessary functions can be eliminated.

The supply chain management flight will be made up of three main sections: materiel management, distribution and the customer liaison section. The flight will provide aircraft parts, mission capability support, due in from maintenance support, supply customer service, vehicle support, aircrew transportation, personal property (household goods) support, and passenger travel support to the wing.

"The realignment will benefit the squadron and the wing," said Chief Griffiths. "For example, combining receiving and cargo operations will mean incoming property to the base can be off loaded and processed at one location, streamlining operations and getting parts to the customer faster."

"The change is very exciting," said Capt. Victoria Asher, 22nd LRS Supply Chain Management Flight commander. "With the reorganization, processes will become better and more efficient."

The readiness flight will include contingency operations, air transportation operations and individual protective equipment management. In other words, the flight will provide mobility support to the wing.

The Fuels Management Flight will encompass fuels operations, the fuels information service center, and compliance and environmental sections.

The Vehicle and Equipment Management Flight will house vehicle maintenance, the property book office, which manages and tracks equipment, and the vehicle management and analysis section.

"It's AFSO 21 at its best," said Lt. Col. Tony Marlowe, 22nd LRS commander. "We're streamlining processes to eliminate waste and increase efficiency and effective wing support. Throughout this change feedback, both internal and external, is going to be very important."

The new structure will also spawn a 22nd LRS Logistics Operation and Compliance Element, which will be part of the commander's support staff and place compliance and analysis, squadron training, document control, resource management and systems management functions under one roof.

"We're evolving logistics practices to provide the warfighters a logistics capability that's integrated, robust and expeditionary," Captain Asher said.

Other bases that were selected for the realignment validation process include Langley Air Force Base, Va., Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark., Luke Air Force Base, Ariz., Hill Air Force Base, Utah, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, Hurlburt Field, Fla., Eielson Air Force Base, Ala., Dover Air Force Base, Del., Pease Air National Guard Base, N.H., and Spangdalem Air Base, Germany.