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McConnell's first EMT Rodeo

Staff Sgt. Aaron Wooton, 22nd Aerospace Medicine Squadron operational medical technician, and Airman 1st Class Ruben Toledo-Bravo 22nd Medicine Support Squadron health services management apprentice, participate in an Emergency Medical Technician Rodeo Aug. 22, 2019, at McConnell Air Force Base, Kan. The rodeo consisted of medical technicians armed with paintball guns enduring a simulated combat scenario while trying to identify and perform combat care tactics. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexi Myrick)

Staff Sgt. Aaron Wooton, 22nd Aerospace Medicine Squadron operational medical technician, and Airman 1st Class Ruben Toledo-Bravo 22nd Medicine Support Squadron health services management apprentice, participate in an Emergency Medical Technician Rodeo Aug. 22, 2019, at McConnell Air Force Base, Kan. The rodeo consisted of medical technicians armed with paintball guns enduring a simulated combat scenario while trying to identify and perform combat care tactics. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexi Myrick)

Members of the 22nd Medical Group discuss the strategy needed to perform Tactical Combat Casualty Care on an Airman with simulated wounds during an Emergency Medical Technician Rodeo Aug. 22, 2019, at McConnell Air Force Base, Kan. The TCCC course replacing the Self Aid and Buddy Care Program are tentatively scheduled to begin at the end of 2019 for Airmen across McConnell. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexi Myrick)

Members of the 22nd Medical Group discuss the strategy needed to perform Tactical Combat Casualty Care on an Airman with simulated wounds during an Emergency Medical Technician Rodeo Aug. 22, 2019, at McConnell Air Force Base, Kan. The TCCC course replacing the Self Aid and Buddy Care Program are tentatively scheduled to begin at the end of 2019 for Airmen across McConnell. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexi Myrick)

Airman 1st Class Anthony Thomason 22nd Healthcare Operation Squadron medical technician, uses Tactical Combat Casualty Care techniques during an Emergency Medical Technician Rodeo Aug. 22, 2019, at McConnell Air Force Base, Kan. TCCC is a standardized course created to give Airmen the tools that they need to survive using lifesaving medical training while in a combat environment. TCCC will replace the Self Aid and Buddy Care Program and will be focus on controlling massive bleeding, care under fire and airway management. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexi Myrick)

Airman 1st Class Anthony Thomason 22nd Healthcare Operation Squadron medical technician, uses Tactical Combat Casualty Care techniques during an Emergency Medical Technician Rodeo Aug. 22, 2019, at McConnell Air Force Base, Kan. TCCC is a standardized course created to give Airmen the tools that they need to survive using lifesaving medical training while in a combat environment. TCCC will replace the Self Aid and Buddy Care Program and will be focus on controlling massive bleeding, care under fire and airway management. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexi Myrick)

Members of the 22nd Medical Group practice using Tactical Combat Casualty Care tactics to stabilize an Airman during an Emergency Medical Technician Rodeo Aug. 22, 2019, at McConnell Air Force Base, Kan. The rodeo provided Airmen from the 22nd MDG the opportunity to perform lifesaving procedures in a simulated combat environment. This training helps identify area of improvement to develop the high-quality military essential for warfighting success. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexi Myrick)

Members of the 22nd Medical Group practice using Tactical Combat Casualty Care tactics to stabilize an Airman during an Emergency Medical Technician Rodeo Aug. 22, 2019, at McConnell Air Force Base, Kan. The rodeo provided Airmen from the 22nd MDG the opportunity to perform lifesaving procedures in a simulated combat environment. This training helps identify area of improvement to develop the high-quality military essential for warfighting success. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexi Myrick)

Staff Sgt. Aaron Wooton, 22nd Aerospace Medicine Squadron operational medical technician, and Airman 1st Class Anthony Thomason 22nd Healthcare Operation Squadron medical technician, drag Airman 1st Class Dylan Nealy 22nd HCOS health services management apprentice, to safety during an Emergency Medical Technician Rodeo Aug. 22, 2019, at McConnell Air Force Base, Kan. The medics practiced Tactical Combat Casualty Care tactics to effectively recover the Airman and stabilize his simulated injuries. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexi Myrick)

Staff Sgt. Aaron Wooton, 22nd Aerospace Medicine Squadron operational medical technician, and Airman 1st Class Anthony Thomason 22nd Healthcare Operation Squadron medical technician, drag Airman 1st Class Dylan Nealy 22nd HCOS health services management apprentice, to safety during an Emergency Medical Technician Rodeo Aug. 22, 2019, at McConnell Air Force Base, Kan. The medics practiced Tactical Combat Casualty Care tactics to effectively recover the Airman and stabilize his simulated injuries. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexi Myrick)

MCCONNELL AIR FORCE BASE, Kan. --

An Airman’s scream echoes, as paint flies through the air, as he is dragged to safety by his peers to receive medical care. This is what Airmen from the 22nd Medical Group experienced during a training Aug. 22, 2019.

 

McConnell’s 22nd MDG held its first Emergency Medical Technician Rodeo, which provided medical personnel an opportunity to practice different types of tactical combat casualty care techniques.

 

The rodeo consisted of medical technicians armed with paintball guns enduring a simulated combat scenario while trying to identify and perform combat care tactics on an Airman with simulated injuries.

 

“Being a ready medic means that our medics are ready to perform their medical training to employ lifesaving effects in a deployed environment,” said Lt. Col. Richard Speakman, 22nd Aerospace Medicine Squadron commander. “The rodeo is how we are simulating some combat scenarios, giving combat stress and teaching medics how to perform under tactical conditions providing combat care.”

 

The medics used Tactical Combat Casualty Care tactics as a way to effectively recover and stabilize the simulated injuries. TCCC is a standardized course created to give Airmen the tools that they need to survive using lifesaving medical training while in a combat environment.

 

“This rodeo is imperative to our medics,” said Joshua Clevenger, 22nd MDG education and training medical technician. “We will use the training to identify what we need to focus on during future training and allow [us] to become more experienced in the field.”

 

The TCCC course will replace the Self Aid and Buddy Care Program and will focus on controlling massive bleeding, care under fire and airway management. The course will also include topics such as tactical evacuation care which is the recovery portion of the care and how to perform lifesaving procedures in a combat environment.

 

Speakman explained that the emphasis on this training is teaching Airmen how to handle the threat while returning fire and performing lifesaving techniques on the injured.

 

Classes for TCCC are tentatively scheduled to begin at the end of 2019 for Airmen across McConnell. For questions, the 22nd MDG can be reached at (316) 759 – 6300.