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McConnell refuels the Thunderbirds over New Mexico skies

An F-16 Fighting Falcon Thunderbird flies through New Mexico skies after being refueled by a KC-135 Stratotanker Oct. 15, 2020. The traditional multirole fighter aircraft has a limited range due to the smaller airframe and requires aerial refueling support to reach further distances. Capable of traveling speeds up to 1,500 miles per hour, they can burn up to 8,000 pounds of fuel at low altitudes. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Alexi Bosarge)

Maj. Trevor “Dozen” Aldridge, United States Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron “Thunderbirds” Left Wing pilot and Thunderbird 2, flies an F-16 Fighting Falcon through New Mexico skies after being refueled by a KC-135 Stratotanker Oct. 15, 2020. The traditional multirole fighter aircraft has a limited range due to the smaller airframe and requires aerial refueling support to reach further distances. Capable of traveling speeds up to 1,500 miles per hour, they can burn up to 8,000 pounds of fuel at low altitudes. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Alexi Bosarge)

Tech. Sgt. Bobby Jones, 350th Air Refueling Squadron in-flight refueling specialist, uses the boom of a KC-135 Stratotanker to transfer fuel to an F-16 Fighting Falcon Thunderbird Oct. 15, 2020, through the skies of New Mexico. The KC-135 passed off fuel to the Thunderbirds, allowing for a quick, non-stop route between destinations. ((U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Alexi Bosarge)

Tech. Sgt. Bobby Jones, 350th Air Refueling Squadron in-flight refueling specialist, uses the boom of a KC-135 Stratotanker to transfer fuel to a United States Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron “Thunderbirds” F-16 Fighting Falcon Oct. 15, 2020, through the skies of New Mexico. The KC-135 passed a total of 28,000 pounds of fuel off to the Thunderbirds, allowing for a quick, non-stop route between destinations. ((U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Alexi Bosarge)

A KC-135 Stratotanker passes fuel to an F-16 Fighting Falcon Thunderbird Oct. 15, 2020, through the skies of New Mexico. The demonstration team was headed to Fort Worth, Texas, for the Bell Fort Worth Alliance Air Show from. The air show is scheduled for Oct. 17-18, 2020. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Alexi Bosarge)

A KC-135 Stratotanker passes fuel to a United States Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron “Thunderbirds” F-16 Fighting Falcon Oct. 15, 2020, through the skies of New Mexico. The team was heading to Fort Worth, Texas, for the Bell Fort Worth Alliance Air Show. The air show is scheduled for Oct. 17-18, 2020. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Alexi Bosarge)

A pilot of an F-16 Fighting Falcon Thunderbird waves to Tech. Sgt. Bobby Jones, 350th Air Refueling Squadron in-flight refueling specialist, after receiving fuel from a KC-135 Stratotanker Oct. 15, 2020 through the skies of New Mexico. The Thunderbirds, the Air Force’s premier aerial demonstration team, were en route to the Bell Fort Worth Alliance Air Show in Fort Worth, Texas. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Alexi Bosarge)

Lt. Col. Kevin “Gator” DiFalco, United States Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron “Thunderbirds” Operations officer and Thunderbird 7, waves to Tech. Sgt. Bobby Jones, 350th Air Refueling Squadron in-flight refueling specialist, after receiving fuel from a KC-135 Stratotanker Oct. 15, 2020 through the skies of New Mexico. The Thunderbirds were en route to the Bell Fort Worth Alliance Air Show in Fort Worth, Texas. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Alexi Bosarge)

MCCONNELL AIR FORCE BASE, Kan. -- Maj. Trevor “Dozen” Aldridge, United States Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron “Thunderbirds” Left Wing pilot and Thunderbird 2, flies an F-16 Fighting Falcon through New Mexico skies after being refueled by a KC-135 Stratotanker Oct. 15, 2020. The traditional multirole fighter aircraft has a limited range due to the smaller airframe and requires aerial refueling support to reach further distances. Capable of traveling speeds up to 1,500 miles per hour, they can burn up to 8,000 pounds of fuel at low altitudes. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Alexi Bosarge)